Monday, April 30, 2012

SETI Telescope to Help US Air Force Track Space Junk - Space.com

Antennas of the Allen Telescope Array
Antennas of the Allen Telescope Array have been used to study signals from remote galaxies, supernova remnants, extrasolar planetary systems, and the interstellar medium. Each antenna is about 20 feet wide. A new contracted job is to assist the U.S. Air Force in situational awareness and detect space debris.
CREDIT: SETI Institute

A privately funded search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) has pulled in its antenna horns a tad to help the U.S. Air Force gauge human-made space junk circling Earth.

The United States Air Force Space Command is on the lookout to improve its Space Surveillance Network, a global setup of radar and optical sensors that detect and track orbiting space junk and satellites.

According to a deal announced April 13, the non-profit research institute SRI International is the new manager of the Hat Creek Radio Observatory in Northern California. That observatory includes the Allen Telescope Array built by the SETI Institute and the University of California.

The Allen Telescope Array is bankrolled, in part, by the well-heeled Paul Allen, a Microsoft co-founder. Its primary mission, like that of SETI, is to listen for any signals that could be from an intelligent civilization among the stars. [10 Alien Encounters Debunked]

Dishing it out

Under SRI's new management role, the Allen Telescope Array is to spend some time conducting space situational awareness and detecting space debris under contract with the U.S. Air Force.

The ATA is a unique and flexible research instrument designed as a "Large Number of Small Dishes" array. Collectively, it is a 42-dish ATA radio telescope that can operate in multiple frequency bands while its digital hardware runs scientific experiments, such as creating images of the sky.

Located in a remote area of Northern California, the ATA receives relatively low levels of radio interference and is surrounded by volcanic mountains that keep out interferences, such as television, radio and distant cellular phone transmissions.

Initial demonstrations

According to the Air Force, through its Space Innovation and Development Center, the ATA can augment the already extensive sensors of the Space Surveillance Network.

Thanks to initial demonstrations using the ATA, the telescope shows the ability to track transmitting satellites in low-Earth orbit, medium-Earth orbit and, most promising, according to the Air Force, in geosynchronous orbit (GEO), which is home to the most costly, highly used, and vital satellites that orbit the Earth.

A collision and subsequent orbital debris field in GEO could permanently remove the GEO belt from worldwide use.

An early use of the ATA for satellite tracking involved the Global Positioning System satellites. The accuracy of the array's observations of GPS spacecraft was assessed.

The Air Force has noted that working with the ATA "may be a natural win-win relationship."

Ongoing SETI

Do the new Air Force duties crimp the use of the ATA to scan the heavens for evidence of ET?

"Because we have planetary systems across the sky, we can effectively share the ATA with the Space Situational Awareness mission," said Jill Tarter, director of the Center for SETI Research at the SETI Institute in Mountain View, Calif.        

The alien-hunting researchers are targeting their searches on extrasolar planets discovered by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, which searches for signs of worlds around other stars.

"We are using our SonATA â€" SETI on the ATA â€" automated signal detection system to observe the thousands of Kepler worlds and exoplanets that have been discovered in the past few years," Tarter told SPACE.com. "Life as we know it is a planetary phenomenon, so we are interested in exploring planets."

Tarter said the equipment can be pointed at known planetary systems and explore the terrestrial microwave window from 1 to 10 gigahertz in search of radio emissions from distant technological civilizations. 

"As SRI begins to manage Hat Creek, we look forward to expanding the use of the Allen Telescope Array to support the wider scientific and technical community in radio astronomy and space science," said Scott Seaton, vice president of SRI's Engineering Research and Development Division, in a news statement.

Leonard David has been reporting on the space industry for more than five decades. He is a winner of last year's National Space Club Press Award and a past editor-in-chief of the National Space Society's Ad Astra and Space World magazines. He has written for SPACE.com since 1999.

Making A Marine - News Channel 7

Last summer, more than a thousand South Carolinahigh school graduates went straight from school, to train for war.

Recruits go through weeks of intense training, teaching them skills to use in combat and to keep them alive.

For the United States Marine Corps, that training happens on Parris Island. Every year, dozens of teachers, coaches and principals, many from the Upstate, are brought in to see that training.

They have to be able to tell high schoolers what it really takes to make a marine. Last month we went along with them.

Recruits arrive on Parris Island packed in a bus, all unified by fear. The first voice they hear is their drill instructor, screaming at them to stand on the yellow footprints. It's the same command given to every recruit that passes throughParris Island's gates.

“We don't tolerate anything but their best effort. They have to give 100 percent of themselves at all time,” said Colonel Wayne Jones, the Recruit Training Regiment Commander.

They learn to do what they're told because not doing so could mean the difference between life and death.

“What really impresses me about them is that they even enlisted in a time of war,” said Col. Jones.

Tracy Todd is witnessing all of the training as an Upstate teacher. She's one of nearly 100 here, as part of a Marine Corps Educators Workshop. She's also the mother of a recruit.

“It is always a fear,” said Todd. “And he's my only child so, so it's scary but, he's ready.”

The vigorous training covers everything, including learning how to survive in the water, repeatedly marching in formation while practicing specific movements and firing M-16s and other rifles as if in combat. They even have to make sure their bed sheets are tucked in perfectly.

The slightest error could result in what’s known as incentive training, where their drill instructor pulls them from the group and commands repeated push-ups, knee lifts, running in place and other physical demands. All while the drill instructor yells at them. The idea is for these recruits to learn from their mistakes.

The recruits, many of them still in their teens, do all of this with the expectation that they will deploy to war as marines.

“Young men and woman who do sign the dotted line, raise their right hand, do so knowing that they are going to be in harms way,” said Captain Barry Morris of the 6th Marine Regiment.

Chris Buttrey, a retired lance corporal, says what he practiced as a recruit became a reality in combat on day one. He says almost no training can prepare you until you're fighting for your life.

“It's hair-raising. It's when you know you're in the thick of it. You're not back home inSouth Carolina anymore,” said Buttrey. “You're out there, and you're fighting and there's a chance you could die.”

With all the stress of war, 7 On Your Side wanted to know if training was enough to prepare these young men and woman to put their lives on the line, fighting for out country? We took that question to Capt. Morris.

“I would say yes. The marines have done a great job,” said Capt. Morris. “That's why we just train, train, train, as much as we can to ensure that our marines are ready to fight. Fit to fight and then fit to come back home too.”

He says the Marine Corps has recently adapted training to better protect marines from enemy forces.

“There's a lot of lessons learned since 2001. We've learned from lessons inIraqandAfghanistan, especially with improvised explosive devices,” said Capt. Morris. “So we've tailored training specifically to identify, target and eliminate some of those hazards that marines will face while deployed.”

Training now includes a Prepare to Deploy Program where marines get a refresher course on all qualifications, priming them for combat both physically and mentally.

And who deploys with them has also changed, to reflect the psychological demands marines face.

“The Marine Corps and the Navy partner together and quickly realized, we need to have medically trained professionals to identify when a marine is stressed, combat stress and post traumatic stress syndrome,” said Capt. Morris. “The earlier we can detect it the better.”

So they can bring them back home safely, to their moms like Tracy. She got to see her son during the trip, in the mess hall. He and the other recruiters greeted the group of educators by shouting out their names, hometown and career choice.

"Good morning ladies, good morning gentlemen! Recruit Todd, Pickens, South Carolina, Combat engineer!" said her son, Taylor Todd.

“I couldn't touch him,” saidTracy after she saw him for the first time in nine weeks.

“And I was not to be overly emotional, so I was really worried about both of those because I want to hug him. It's been a long time.”

It was the first of many happy reunions she's hoping for.

“It actually makes me feel better because I can see first hand, he's really being prepared for it,” saidTracy. “So when it happens, he'll come home. Hopefully he's going to come home."

But first, Recruit Todd along with the hundreds of other recruits still pounding the pavement have to earn their spot on graduation day, where they can finally call themselves marines.

After recruit training, marines go through two more phases of training before they're deployed.

Click the links for more information on the USMC or other Armed Forces.

Pacific Armies strengthen ties during medical conference in Bangkok - DVIDS



BANGKOK, Thailand â€" The 22nd iteration of the Asia-Pacific Military Medicine Conference began in the Thai capital, April 30. Nearly 500 military medical professionals from over 40 nations are attending this year’s conference, which is co-hosted by the Royal Thai and the United States armies.

APMMC provides a forum for military health care providers to discuss topics, issues, and concerns of military medical significance with allied and friendly countries in the Asia Pacific region.

The conference theme this year is “Diversity is Our Strength: Regional Security through Collaboration.” APMMC runs from April 30-May 4.

“The APMMC is the single most beneficial, multilateral conference that we host here in the Pacific. The opportunity to bring professionals from around the Pacific as well as around the World together here in Bangkok enables each of us to gain a greater understanding of each others' strengths and challenges,” said Brig. Gen. Keith W. Gallagher, Commander, Pacific Regional Medical Command, Tripler Army Medical Command and Command Surgeon, United States Army Pacific.

A large number of military medical topics are being discussed, such as influenza, HIV, emerging infectious diseases, malaria, preventive medicine, deployment health for peacekeeping operations and other contingency operations, military medical aid to civil agencies, health service support, combat medicine, triage and casualty evacuation, medical readiness, behavioral health, Wounded Warrior Care, medical technology, medical training, simulation training and research and medical interoperability.

Areas of special emphasis include nursing, veterinary medicine, and medic/non-commissioned officer development.

“Through discussion, adult learning and collegiality we learn and grow from the many professional presentations and posters and build a greater intellect and capacity that we return to our nations for further learning and implementation,” said Gallagher.

“The ability to put a name to a face and to have an email and a phone number means we can talk and write one another for years to come. We'll also know one another when we train together in exercises or in support of a humanitarian disaster,” he added.

Participants will also get hands-on with some of the latest medical technology thanks to a number of medical displays set up by civilian medical companies.

Nations attending include Australia, Bangladesh, Belgium, Brunei, Cambodia, Canada, Comoros, Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kiribati, Laos, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritius, Mongolia, Nepal, New Zealand, Pakistan, Palau, Papua New Guinea, People’s Republic of China, Philippines, Republic of Marshall Islands, Russia, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor Leste (East Timor), Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu and Vietnam.

World Health Organization representatives are also participating.

“The fact that this is the Army's 23rd in a row conference speaks volumes to its sustainability and continued growth. This conference ranks among the best in the world for bringing quality speakers, lessons learned about combat, humanitarian assistance operations, and the sharing of best practices in delivery healthcare in urban and remote areas will undoubtedly help mankind,” Gallagher concluded.


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ImagesAPMMC starts
Nearly 500 military medical professionals from over 40...
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Group photo of the primary nation participants of the...
ImagesAPMMC media interview
Brig. Gen. Keith W. Gallagher, commander, Pacific...


U.S. Marine Corps Places $3.6 Million Order for AeroVironment RQ-11B Raven ... - MarketWatch (press release)

MONROVIA, Calif., Apr 30, 2012 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- AeroVironment, Inc. /quotes/zigman/104484/quotes/nls/avav AVAV -1.15% announced it received a firm fixed-price order valued at $3,653,519 on March 15, 2012 from the United States Marine Corps through an existing U.S. Army contract. The order includes RQ-11B Raven(R) small unmanned aircraft systems and initial spares packages. The systems and spares were scheduled for delivery before April 17, 2012.

"The Raven system remains the cornerstone small UAS capability for the Marines and other military services, providing proven, reliable frontline situational awareness, anywhere and at any time," said Tom Herring, AeroVironment senior vice president and general manager, Unmanned Aircraft Systems.

The RQ-11B Raven unmanned aircraft system is a 4.2-pound, backpackable, hand-launched sensor platform that provides day and night, real-time video imagery wirelessly to a portable ground control station for "over the hill" and "around the corner" reconnaissance, surveillance and target acquisition in support of tactical units. U.S. armed forces use Raven systems extensively for missions such as base security, route reconnaissance, mission planning and force protection. Each Raven system typically consists of three aircraft, two ground control stations and spares.

About AeroVironment's Family of Small UAS

RQ-11B Raven(R), Wasp(TM), RQ-20A Puma AE(TM) and Shrike VTOL(TM) comprise AeroVironment's Family of Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems. Operating with a common ground control system (GCS), this Family of Systems provides increased capability to the warfighter that can give ground commanders the option of selecting the appropriate aircraft based on the type of mission to be performed. This increased capability has the potential to provide significant force protection and force multiplication benefits to small tactical units and security personnel. AeroVironment has delivered thousands of new and replacement small unmanned air vehicles. International purchasers of AeroVironment's small UAS include the armed forces of Italy, Denmark, the Netherlands, Spain, France, Norway, the Czech Republic, Thailand and Australia.

The Qube(TM) small UAS is tailored to law enforcement, first response and other public safety missions. Small enough to fit easily in the trunk of a car, the Qube system can be unpacked, assembled and ready for flight in less than five minutes, giving the operator a rapidly deployable eye in the sky at a fraction of the cost of manned aircraft and large unmanned aircraft.

About AeroVironment, Inc.

AeroVironment is a technology solutions provider that designs, develops, produces, operates and supports an advanced portfolio of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) and electric transportation solutions. Agencies of the U.S. Department of Defense and allied military services use the company's electric-powered, hand-launched unmanned aircraft systems extensively to provide situational awareness to tactical operating units through real-time, airborne reconnaissance, surveillance and communication. Multiple government agencies have helped to fund the development and demonstration of Global Observer(R), a hybrid-electric, stratospheric UAS designed to provide affordable, persistent reconnaissance and communication over any location on the globe. Switchblade(TM) is a loitering munition designed to provide a rapid, lethal, pinpoint precision strike capability with minimal collateral damage. AeroVironment's electric transportation solutions include a comprehensive suite of electric vehicle (EV) charging systems, installation and data services for consumers, automakers, utilities and government agencies, power cycling and test systems for EV developers and industrial electric vehicle charging systems for commercial fleets. More information about AeroVironment is available at www.avinc.com .

Safe Harbor Statement

Certain statements in this press release may constitute "forward-looking statements" as that term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements are made on the basis of current expectations, forecasts and assumptions that involve risks and uncertainties, including, but not limited to, economic, competitive, governmental and technological factors outside of our control, that may cause our business, strategy or actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, our ability to perform under existing contracts and obtain additional contracts; changes in the regulatory environment; the activities of competitors; failure of the markets in which we operate to grow; failure to expand into new markets; failure to develop new products or integrate new technology with current products; and general economic and business conditions in the United States and elsewhere in the world. For a further list and description of such risks and uncertainties, see the reports we file with the Securities and Exchange Commission. We do not intend, and undertake no obligation, to update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

Additional AV News: http://www.avinc.com/resources/news AV Media Gallery: http://www.avinc.com/media_gallery Follow us: http://www.twitter.com/aerovironment Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ #!/pages/AeroVironment-Inc/91762492182

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SOURCE: AeroVironment, Inc.

                        AeroVironment, Inc.           Steven Gitlin           +1 (626) 357-9983           pr@avinc.com           or           For AeroVironment, Inc.           Mark Boyer           +1 (310) 229-5956           mark@boyersyndicate.com                

Copyright Business Wire 2012

/quotes/zigman/104484/quotes/nls/avav

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Volume: 11,451

April 30, 2012 9:45a

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$417,178

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Mother's Agony: Saying Goodbye to a Daughter, Hero - Patch.com

Cynthia Hovey is wrestling with an unfailing and unfair truth: Children do, indeed, die before their parents.

Today is her daughter's birthday. Michele would have been 32.

Five weeks have passed since she died, and it may as well have been yesterday. Talking about Michele -- her only daughter -- is nothing short of agony, with both comfort and affliction coming to visit.

"I can't believe she's gone," Hovey said, while rocking in a porch swing at the back of her Snellville home, a pack of cigarettes in hand. "I turn around, and either see stuff she gave me, or things that we used. I mean, she's everywhere."

Hovey had hoped to repair a fractured relationship that plagued the pair for years. At the New Year, she'd written an email letter to Michelle, hoping she'd see how proud of her she was. A couple of months later, she sat at her daughter's hospital bedside, hoping prayer would save her from cancer.

And, then, time ran out.

Lesli Michele Fellers Monroe was put to rest on March 24.

"A parent should not outlive their children," Hovey said. "I can't deal with this. I don't know how."

Unbreakable Bonds

Hovey was 23 when she had Michele, and remembers being a new mother with new pride and a bond that could not be matched.

"I didn't know you could put babies down, so I carried her all the time," she said. "We were very close, till she got to the teenage years, and then the rebellion hit hard."

Hovey raised her three children -- including two sons, Graham and Andrew -- basically by herself, she says. So, all their good traits and bad traits, Hovey accepts.

Michele, for example, was very caring -- doting on her brothers when they were children and taking in animals that needed rescue when she was older, but she could also be high-strung. It was no surprise that Michele wanted to leave home when she graduated high school.

She wanted to see the world, but she also wanted a chance at a better education -- one her mother could not afford for her. So, she decided to serve her country in the United States Air Force.

"I always raised them that they could do anything they put their mind to," Hovey said. "I signed her up, so it was all right with me."

When her first deployment to Kuwait came up in 2003, Michele made the drive up from the Charleston Air Force Base to tell her mother in person. When she returned several months later, she was full of confidence and peace. 

Once a year, Hovey would make a trip for her birthday to visit Michele in Charleston. She remembers her daughter always making those times special with many planned activities, like seeing Keith Urban one year. They were more like friends then.

"Instead of making your birthday feel like it was just some date coming to dread, she made it like a celebration," Hovey said. 

Inevitable Change

Before another deployment to Iraq in 2005, Hovey was proud to learn that her daughter -- who threw like her, "which wasn't very good" -- shot an M-16 almost as well as a sharpshooter.

"I never knew how she got into that because I am afraid to look at a gun, much less hold one," Hovey said.

On that final tour, Michele saw combat. She came back different, her mother says. She became distant. Then, she got angry.

Hovey recounts: "She wasn't Michelle anymore."

Eventually, Michele did leave the military. Still, she and her mother did not have much contact until she married Andy Moore in 2010. After the wedding, things dropped off again.

"We couldn't connect where we needed to be," Hovey said, sighing heavily. "I did not know how to deal with someone who had come back from Iraq."

"There was too much change that I couldn't accept," she added.

Three months ago, Hovey decided she just had to clear the air. She'd missed so much with her only daughter; she wanted to make things right again.

She sat down and typed a long email. "It was everything -- from the time she was little until now. And, I just, I just left it, and I'd been trying to reach her and get her to email me or something, and she wouldn't," Hovey said, her voice cracking slightly. "So, I just left it alone."

Death Knocks

In mid-to-late March, Hovey did finally receive a call. It was not the call she had hoped for. Instead, Michele's mother-in-law telephoned to tell Hovey that her daughter was in an Augusta hospital with an aggressive cancer.

Hovey, and her husband Dan, where there visiting her the weekend of St. Patrick's Day, and then Michele sent them back home. The very next weekend, she was gone.

What Hovey learned about her daughter from her friends and co-workers helps lift her spirits. Even one of the worst customers, she said, brought Michele flowers to the hospital.

"She had a way about her -- all my kids -- you know when they enter a room, you just had this feeling," Hovey said. "She made you feel good. She made you laugh."

Those memories are a welcome contrast to quiet moments when Hovey is left alone to remember the funeral, ponder special days like Mother's Day, or look at things she wanted to give her -- one day. 

She does not let regret gnaw at her about all the time she and her daughter spent apart. Children have to make their own way, she says. At some point, parents have to let go and let them.

She has small heart-shaped urn that holds some of Michele's ashes, and it's fitting for the little girl who grew up to defend her country and capture the hearts of people who barely knew her.

"It's the heart that matters; I think I taught them that," she says of her children.

And, for that, Cynthia Hovey can be proud of her daughter, and herself.

Rocker Ted Nugent steamed over Ft. Knox concert snub - Detroit Free Press

Uncle Ted isn't too happy now that he has been nixed from a summertime concert he was scheduled to play at Ft. Knox, Ky.

"To think that there's a bureaucrat in the United States Army that would consider the use or abuse of First Amendment rights in determining who is going to perform at an Army base is an insult and defiles the sacrifices of those heroes who fought for the U.S. Constitution, Bill of Rights," Ted Nugent told the Associated Press.

Last week, in response to the controversial comments Nugent made about President Barack Obama and the Democratic Party at the National Rifle Association convention April 14 in St. Louis, commanders at Ft. Knox decided the Motor City Madman would not be joining acts like REO Speedwagon and Styx at the June 23 concert.

Nugent, 63, who was born in Detroit but now lives in Texas, was cleared of being a threat to the president after meeting with two members of the Secret Service in Oklahoma following the NRA convention, where he said he'd "either be dead or in jail by this time next year" if Obama wins in November.

Nugent, immediately following his sit-down with Uncle Sam, called it a "good, solid, professional meeting concluding that I have never made any threats of violence towards anyone. The meeting could not have gone better."

But now that he's been scratched from the Ft. Knox show, the Nuge is singing a different tune.

"There is nothing in my spoken word or written word that could be even wildly considered by any stretch of the imagination to be a threat to anyone," Nugent said to the AP about the cancellation.

When asked to clarify the comments he made at the NRA, Nugent said: "A whole bunch of us ... believe ... we are in danger of being improperly and criminally jailed -- I mean criminally on the part of the government."

'Burn' honored at Tribeca

"Burn," the Detroit-made film about firefighters, won the audience award for documentary at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York City, organizers announced Saturday.

Although there's no set opening date for "Burn," filmmakers Brenna Sanchez, who grew up on Detroit's west side, and Tom Putnam recently told the Free Press that they hope to screen their movie in the D as soon as possible.

For more on "Burn," head to www.detroitfirefilm.org .

"Any Day Now," the Alan Cumming-starring film about gay adoption, won the 11th annual festival's audience award for narrative feature.

On Friday Justin Bieber and his manager, Scooter Braun, also were recognized. The two, along with Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey and filmmaker and actor Ed Burns, were named winners of Disruptive Innovation Awards, honoring those changing the industry with new technologies, ideas and strategies.

Briefly

• NBC plans to run three 30-minute episodes of "Community" for the sitcom's big third-season finale May 17, TV Guide reports.

• Former cast member Will Ferrell will host the May 12 episode of "Saturday Night Live," NBC announced. Usher will be the musical guest.

Weekend box office

Although "The Avengers" won't be released domestically until Friday, the new superhero saga already is beating down box-office opponents.

The Joss Whedon-directed film featuring an A-list cast -- including Robert Downey Jr., Chris Hemsworth, and Scarlett Johansson -- rang up $178.4 million during the weekend as it opened No. 1 in 39 different markets worldwide, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

Here's the domestic box office:

1. " Think Like a Man," $18 million.

2. " The Pirates! Band of Misfits," $11.4 million.

3. " The Lucky One," $11.3 million.

4. " The Hunger Games," $11.2 million.

5. " The Five-Year Engagement," $11.2 million.

6. " Safe," $7.7 million.

7. " The Raven," $7.3 million.

8. " Chimpanzee," $5.5 million.

9. " The Three Stooges," $5.4 million.

10. " The Cabin in the Woods," $4.5 million.

COMPILED BY B.J. HAMMERSTEIN, FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER. CONTACT HIM: 313-223-4528 OR BJHAMMERSTEIN@FREEPRESS.COM.

More Details: Fast takes

1. Seacrest to join 'Today'

NBC News said in an announcement that "American Idol" host Ryan Seacrest has signed a two-year deal with NBC Universal. As part of his role, the pop culture personality will contribute regularly on the "Today" show as a special correspondent, and he'll also expand his duties on the network's other platforms.

2. Dempsey to the rescue

Patrick Dempsey ("Grey's Anatomy") came to the rescue when a car driven by a teenage boy flipped several times and landed on the front lawn of the star's Malibu, Calif., home on Tuesday, www.tmz.com reports. Dempsey helped the driver, who suffered a concussion, out of the totaled car with a crowbar.

3. Beauty queen arrested

Nicole Houde, 26, the 2010 Miss New Hampshire USA, was arrested Wednesday on charges of punching, kicking, scratching and biting her boyfriend, Scott Nickerson, 33, Manchester Police Department officials said Sunday, according to the Associated Press.

Rocker Ted Nugent steamed over Ft. Knox concert snub - Detroit Free Press

Uncle Ted isn't too happy now that he has been nixed from a summertime concert he was scheduled to play at Ft. Knox, Ky.

"To think that there's a bureaucrat in the United States Army that would consider the use or abuse of First Amendment rights in determining who is going to perform at an Army base is an insult and defiles the sacrifices of those heroes who fought for the U.S. Constitution, Bill of Rights," Ted Nugent told the Associated Press.

Last week, in response to the controversial comments Nugent made about President Barack Obama and the Democratic Party at the National Rifle Association convention April 14 in St. Louis, commanders at Ft. Knox decided the Motor City Madman would not be joining acts like REO Speedwagon and Styx at the June 23 concert.

Nugent, 63, who was born in Detroit but now lives in Texas, was cleared of being a threat to the president after meeting with two members of the Secret Service in Oklahoma following the NRA convention, where he said he'd "either be dead or in jail by this time next year" if Obama wins in November.

Nugent, immediately following his sit-down with Uncle Sam, called it a "good, solid, professional meeting concluding that I have never made any threats of violence towards anyone. The meeting could not have gone better."

But now that he's been scratched from the Ft. Knox show, the Nuge is singing a different tune.

"There is nothing in my spoken word or written word that could be even wildly considered by any stretch of the imagination to be a threat to anyone," Nugent said to the AP about the cancellation.

When asked to clarify the comments he made at the NRA, Nugent said: "A whole bunch of us ... believe ... we are in danger of being improperly and criminally jailed -- I mean criminally on the part of the government."

'Burn' honored at Tribeca

"Burn," the Detroit-made film about firefighters, won the audience award for documentary at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York City, organizers announced Saturday.

Although there's no set opening date for "Burn," filmmakers Brenna Sanchez, who grew up on Detroit's west side, and Tom Putnam recently told the Free Press that they hope to screen their movie in the D as soon as possible.

For more on "Burn," head to www.detroitfirefilm.org .

"Any Day Now," the Alan Cumming-starring film about gay adoption, won the 11th annual festival's audience award for narrative feature.

On Friday Justin Bieber and his manager, Scooter Braun, also were recognized. The two, along with Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey and filmmaker and actor Ed Burns, were named winners of Disruptive Innovation Awards, honoring those changing the industry with new technologies, ideas and strategies.

Briefly

• NBC plans to run three 30-minute episodes of "Community" for the sitcom's big third-season finale May 17, TV Guide reports.

• Former cast member Will Ferrell will host the May 12 episode of "Saturday Night Live," NBC announced. Usher will be the musical guest.

Weekend box office

Although "The Avengers" won't be released domestically until Friday, the new superhero saga already is beating down box-office opponents.

The Joss Whedon-directed film featuring an A-list cast -- including Robert Downey Jr., Chris Hemsworth, and Scarlett Johansson -- rang up $178.4 million during the weekend as it opened No. 1 in 39 different markets worldwide, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

Here's the domestic box office:

1. " Think Like a Man," $18 million.

2. " The Pirates! Band of Misfits," $11.4 million.

3. " The Lucky One," $11.3 million.

4. " The Hunger Games," $11.2 million.

5. " The Five-Year Engagement," $11.2 million.

6. " Safe," $7.7 million.

7. " The Raven," $7.3 million.

8. " Chimpanzee," $5.5 million.

9. " The Three Stooges," $5.4 million.

10. " The Cabin in the Woods," $4.5 million.

COMPILED BY B.J. HAMMERSTEIN, FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER. CONTACT HIM: 313-223-4528 OR BJHAMMERSTEIN@FREEPRESS.COM.

More Details: Fast takes

1. Seacrest to join 'Today'

NBC News said in an announcement that "American Idol" host Ryan Seacrest has signed a two-year deal with NBC Universal. As part of his role, the pop culture personality will contribute regularly on the "Today" show as a special correspondent, and he'll also expand his duties on the network's other platforms.

2. Dempsey to the rescue

Patrick Dempsey ("Grey's Anatomy") came to the rescue when a car driven by a teenage boy flipped several times and landed on the front lawn of the star's Malibu, Calif., home on Tuesday, www.tmz.com reports. Dempsey helped the driver, who suffered a concussion, out of the totaled car with a crowbar.

3. Beauty queen arrested

Nicole Houde, 26, the 2010 Miss New Hampshire USA, was arrested Wednesday on charges of punching, kicking, scratching and biting her boyfriend, Scott Nickerson, 33, Manchester Police Department officials said Sunday, according to the Associated Press.

Rocker Ted Nugent steamed over Ft. Knox concert snub - Detroit Free Press

Uncle Ted isn't too happy now that he has been nixed from a summertime concert he was scheduled to play at Ft. Knox, Ky.

"To think that there's a bureaucrat in the United States Army that would consider the use or abuse of First Amendment rights in determining who is going to perform at an Army base is an insult and defiles the sacrifices of those heroes who fought for the U.S. Constitution, Bill of Rights," Ted Nugent told the Associated Press.

Last week, in response to the controversial comments Nugent made about President Barack Obama and the Democratic Party at the National Rifle Association convention April 14 in St. Louis, commanders at Ft. Knox decided the Motor City Madman would not be joining acts like REO Speedwagon and Styx at the June 23 concert.

Nugent, 63, who was born in Detroit but now lives in Texas, was cleared of being a threat to the president after meeting with two members of the Secret Service in Oklahoma following the NRA convention, where he said he'd "either be dead or in jail by this time next year" if Obama wins in November.

Nugent, immediately following his sit-down with Uncle Sam, called it a "good, solid, professional meeting concluding that I have never made any threats of violence towards anyone. The meeting could not have gone better."

But now that he's been scratched from the Ft. Knox show, the Nuge is singing a different tune.

"There is nothing in my spoken word or written word that could be even wildly considered by any stretch of the imagination to be a threat to anyone," Nugent said to the AP about the cancellation.

When asked to clarify the comments he made at the NRA, Nugent said: "A whole bunch of us ... believe ... we are in danger of being improperly and criminally jailed -- I mean criminally on the part of the government."

'Burn' honored at Tribeca

"Burn," the Detroit-made film about firefighters, won the audience award for documentary at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York City, organizers announced Saturday.

Although there's no set opening date for "Burn," filmmakers Brenna Sanchez, who grew up on Detroit's west side, and Tom Putnam recently told the Free Press that they hope to screen their movie in the D as soon as possible.

For more on "Burn," head to www.detroitfirefilm.org .

"Any Day Now," the Alan Cumming-starring film about gay adoption, won the 11th annual festival's audience award for narrative feature.

On Friday Justin Bieber and his manager, Scooter Braun, also were recognized. The two, along with Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey and filmmaker and actor Ed Burns, were named winners of Disruptive Innovation Awards, honoring those changing the industry with new technologies, ideas and strategies.

Briefly

• NBC plans to run three 30-minute episodes of "Community" for the sitcom's big third-season finale May 17, TV Guide reports.

• Former cast member Will Ferrell will host the May 12 episode of "Saturday Night Live," NBC announced. Usher will be the musical guest.

Weekend box office

Although "The Avengers" won't be released domestically until Friday, the new superhero saga already is beating down box-office opponents.

The Joss Whedon-directed film featuring an A-list cast -- including Robert Downey Jr., Chris Hemsworth, and Scarlett Johansson -- rang up $178.4 million during the weekend as it opened No. 1 in 39 different markets worldwide, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

Here's the domestic box office:

1. " Think Like a Man," $18 million.

2. " The Pirates! Band of Misfits," $11.4 million.

3. " The Lucky One," $11.3 million.

4. " The Hunger Games," $11.2 million.

5. " The Five-Year Engagement," $11.2 million.

6. " Safe," $7.7 million.

7. " The Raven," $7.3 million.

8. " Chimpanzee," $5.5 million.

9. " The Three Stooges," $5.4 million.

10. " The Cabin in the Woods," $4.5 million.

COMPILED BY B.J. HAMMERSTEIN, FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER. CONTACT HIM: 313-223-4528 OR BJHAMMERSTEIN@FREEPRESS.COM.

More Details: Fast takes

1. Seacrest to join 'Today'

NBC News said in an announcement that "American Idol" host Ryan Seacrest has signed a two-year deal with NBC Universal. As part of his role, the pop culture personality will contribute regularly on the "Today" show as a special correspondent, and he'll also expand his duties on the network's other platforms.

2. Dempsey to the rescue

Patrick Dempsey ("Grey's Anatomy") came to the rescue when a car driven by a teenage boy flipped several times and landed on the front lawn of the star's Malibu, Calif., home on Tuesday, www.tmz.com reports. Dempsey helped the driver, who suffered a concussion, out of the totaled car with a crowbar.

3. Beauty queen arrested

Nicole Houde, 26, the 2010 Miss New Hampshire USA, was arrested Wednesday on charges of punching, kicking, scratching and biting her boyfriend, Scott Nickerson, 33, Manchester Police Department officials said Sunday, according to the Associated Press.

Sunday, April 29, 2012

Bloomingdale area Marine Corps recruiters working with those interested in ... - NorthJersey.com

The young men and women frequently seen running with a uniformed member of the United States Marine Corps along borough roadways in the afternoon are preparing for the challenge of a lifetime.

Working with prospective Marine boots who are preparing the bodies and minds for Marine Corps training at the Bloomingdale recruiting office are Staff Sergeant Obrian Sangster, Staff Sgt. Shaun Getty, Sgt. Thomas McNicholas and Sgt. Ruby Vetreino.

STAFF PHOTOS BY JOE SARNO

Working with prospective Marine boots who are preparing the bodies and minds for Marine Corps training at the Bloomingdale recruiting office are Staff Sergeant Obrian Sangster, Staff Sgt. Shaun Getty, Sgt. Thomas McNicholas and Sgt. Ruby Vetreino.

Training cadets perform their sit-ups Thursday as part of preconditioning to get them ready for the rigors of boot camp.

Training cadets perform their sit-ups Thursday as part of preconditioning to get them ready for the rigors of boot camp.

They are the few who are smart enough and strong enough to have been accepted into a training program that will prepare them both mentally and physically for their futures as members of the U.S. Marine Corps.

These young people have passed an entrance exam, and if they are still in high school or college, they must maintain a minimum "C" average. They cannot have used drugs, have a felony arrest record, or have any gang-affiliated tattoos. And, before they sign their final commitment, they must have graduated from high school. A GED does not qualify for entrance into the Marines.

In other words, this is not an easy outfit to join!

Staff Sergeant/Station Commander Obrian D. Sangster of the Bloomingdale Recruiting Station is emphatic about the high standards maintained by the Marine Corps.

"We are not hurting for people. We have young men and women who are in high school and community college walk in every week, and we work very closely with these kids. Before we can even interview them, they have to pass an entrance exam," said SSgt. Sangster.

Then, once they have been accepted into the program, while they are still in school, they have to provide a copy of every report card so the recruiting station can review their grades.

"Even though we expect them to maintain at least a 'C' average, that doesn't mean they can let their grades slip to 'C's.' If they do we'll need to sit down with them and talk about keeping their grades up â€" see if there is something we can do to help. We provide a service. It's really a mentoring program," Sangster said.

Currently there are some 26 young men and women in the local preparation-training program, waiting to get into boot camp.

"If someone were to come in today and be accepted into the program, the earliest they could go to boot camp would be November. Of those who are accepted, only 3 to 4 percent drop out," SSgt. Sangster said, adding that there is no legally binding commitment to remain in the Corps until beginning boot camp.

"We have four full-time employees at this recruiting station, SSgt. Shaun Getty, Sgt. Ruby Vetreno, Sgt. Thomas Minicholas and myself, and we always try to meet with the parents before anyone joins the program," said SSgt. Sangster, although parental consent is only required for those who are not yet 18.

After passing the entrance exam, SSgt. Sangster said, "During the interview, we want to know why they are here â€" what they want to do. There are a lot of opportunities to be trained for a wide variety of occupations in the Marine Corps so we want to know where their interest lies, and we also give an aptitude test to see what they qualify for."

These United States Marine Corps occupations include aviation mechanic, computer programmer, electrician, air-traffic controller, legal-services specialist, public affairs, intelligence specialist, and military police, and the list goes on to include the elite Musician Enlistment Option Program (MEOP), where members perform full time as Marines and as musicians.

And while the young men and women engaged in this pre-boot camp training program here may not yet be certain which Marine Corps occupation they will pursue, they are all enthusiastically looking forward to meeting the challenges that lie ahead.

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MSG JAMES RAYMOND McCORVEY USAF, Ret. - Times Herald-Record

Times Herald Record Obituaries Sign the Guestbook

October 22, 1930 - April 3, 2012

Rock Tavern, NY

James Raymond McCorvey of Rock Tavern, NY, formerly of Washingtonville, NY beloved husband of Mary Buhl McCorvey, passed away peacefully into the arms of Jesus at home on April 3, 2012, following a long illness.

Born October 22, 1930 in Albany, GA; he was the oldest child of the late Levy and Mable McCorvey. Jim joined the United States Air Force and was a career soldier serving 20 years, including a tour in Italy, Japan and Vietnam. He also served at numerous air bases in the US. Jim also worked for H & R Block for fifteen years and at West Point for sixteen years. While at the USMA, Lt. General Daniel W. Christman, USMA Superintendent, awarded Jim a certificate for "Exceptional Service" in recognition of his laudable service to the Academy.

Jim was married to Pearl Jones, deceased, to Barbara Bradatsch, deceased, and is survived by his wife Mary of twenty-three years. He leaves behind five step-children and their families: Tim Buhl and his wife Cassie of Montana, Becky Shields and her husband Jim of New Jersey, Sue Cafarelli and her husband Steve of Long Island, Joe Bradatsch of North Carolina, and David Robertson of Newburgh. In addition Jim leaves behind four grandchildren: Sydney and Taylor Shields, Tyler and Jason Cafarelli and two nephews, Michael and Blaire McCorvey and their wives. Jim's brother Paul and his wife Helen reside in Manchester, GA.

Jim was a fun-loving and gregarious man who loved the church. At various times Jim was a member of three area Presbyterian churches: Little Brittan, Bethlehem, and Westminster of Rock Tavern. At one time or another he served as Treasurer, Sunday school teacher, Deacon and Elder. He loved animals and he had 27 birds, cats and dogs. He liked to tell jokes and have a good laugh, and was always a gentleman. He belonged to the Good Fellowship Dartball League and to VFW Post 8691 of Washingtonville. He also loved music. He maintained a very large music library and was a member of the Golden Songsters.

A Memorial Service will be held on May 5 at 11:00 a.m. at Westminster Presbyterian Church located on Station Road in Rock Tavern, NY. Dr. John Vance will conduct the service. A reception will follow in the church fellowship hall. For directions consult www.westminsterchurch-ny.org or call the church (845) 496-7971. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Jim's memory to the "Westminster Deacon Fund" a fund dedicated to helping those in need.

In Terrorists' Testimony, a Rare, Intimate Look Into a Secretive World - New York Times

There was a British man who nearly became the second shoe bomber and took his orders directly from Osama bin Laden.

There was a man from Long Island who, after dropping out of the United States Army during training, traveled to Afghanistan to fight American troops alongside the Taliban.

And there were two high-school classmates from Flushing, Queens, who trained at a terrorist camp in Pakistan and returned to the United States with orders to stage suicide attacks on New York City subways during rush hour.

This was the cast of characters that took the stand as cooperating witnesses for the government in the trial of Adis Medunjanin, a Queens man who is accused of participating in the subway bombing plot, which federal officials have called one of the most serious threats to American security since the Sept. 11 attacks.

The jury hearing the case in Federal District Court in Brooklyn is expected to begin its deliberations on Monday. Mr. Medunjanin faces up to life in prison if convicted.

A rare terrorism trial stemming from a credible plot that was days away from being executed has yielded the even rarer spectacle of admitted terrorists testifying for the government they had sworn to fight â€" and against one of their own.

The testimony of the four men â€" Zarein Ahmedzay, Saajid Badat, Bryant Neal Vinas and Najibullah Zazi â€" was interspersed with moments of tears, conviction and regret, and provided a detailed and unusually human window into a normally secretive world, as each man described the journey that led him to the cusp of committing mass murder on behalf of Al Qaeda.

Though there are limits to what can be extrapolated from their personal tales, common themes emerged. They were all young Muslim men living in the West who were influenced by the fiery preaching of radical clerics: most often by Anwar al-Awlaki, who called on all Muslims to take up arms.

All of them traveled to the Middle East to fight against American troops in protest of what they viewed as the occupation of Afghanistan. They were all recruited to terrorist training camps, where they were told by Qaeda leaders that their passports made them far more valuable as suicide bombers back home, and they all struggled with the moral implications of their actions as they prepared to kill as many people as possible.

All four men pleaded guilty: three are testifying in the hope of leniency at sentencing, while the fourth, Mr. Badat, was released early from a prison in Britain in exchange for his cooperation.

Mr. Zazi said he hoped to get “a second chance.”

The government has highlighted the cooperation of four convicted terrorists as a sign of its success in undermining groups like Al Qaeda by using the threat of punishment to get their members to turn on one another, in much the same way as prosecutors took on the mob in an earlier era.

“As you apply a law enforcement model to these cases, people always cooperate,” said Anthony S. Barkow, a former federal prosecutor who specialized in terrorism cases and now works in private practice. “It took a long time in organized crime; it is taking less time with national security.”

On the stand, the men professed their Islamic faith but distanced themselves from the Qaeda leadership, which one man said had “brainwashed” him and another accused of using young religious fighters as pawns.

Their appearances in a usually sleepy courthouse in the heart of Brooklyn â€" which went unnoticed by the families who played each day in the park outside â€" have been used by some as evidence that the United States justice system was well positioned to handle terrorism cases.

“The federal courts are not just about providing due process and protecting defendants’ rights,” said Jonathan Hafetz, a professor at Seton Hall University School of Law who focuses on national security. “There is an information-producing function that allows the public to see how terrorists act and how the government acts to prosecute these terrorists.”

He added, “That’s something that we lose when we deal with more secretive processes like military commissions.”

The testimonies of Mr. Badat and Mr. Vinas were unrelated to the 2009 subway bombing plot that was the subject of Mr. Medunjanin’s trial. Instead, they were called as expert witnesses about Al Qaeda to corroborate facts about terrorist training camps in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Leslie D. Howe - Hannibal.net

Long-time Legislative Advocate for the California Retailers Association Leslie D. Howe passed away on April 24, 2012.
He was born in Brookfield, Mo., on Nov. 12, 1923, to Faye and Leslie Howe.
In 1941, L.D. graduated from Hannibal High School, a champion high jumper, basketball star and pool shark extraordinaire. He was enrolled at the University of Missouri, Columbia, when World War II interrupted his college career. On Dec. 12, 1942, L.D. enlisted in the United States Navy and was stationed at University of California at Berkeley. While in the Navy, L.D. continued to hone his high jumping skills, breaking and setting records. Upon separation from the U.S. Navy in 1946, he served many years as an officer in the Naval Reserves.
L.D. earned a B.S. degree in public administration from the University of Missouri in 1947 and the degree of Master of Science in Government Management from the University of Denver. He subsequently had a Fellowship in Governmental Affairs.
In 1948, while doing post graduate work at the University of Denver, L.D. took first place in the high jump in the Rocky Mountain Association AAU Track and Field meet. This win qualified L.D. to try out for the 1948 Olympics.
L.D. enjoyed a long and successful career as vice president, Governmental Affairs, for the California Retailers Association, eventually assuming the position of president of the Association. L.D. was named among the Top 20 Lobbyists by the California Journal, The Monthly Report on State Government and Politics, September, 1974. In the publication, California’s Tax Machine: A History of Taxing and Spending in the Golden State, written by David R. Doerr, second edition, 2008, Les Howe “…played a key role in promoting the exemption [California inventory property tax exemption].”
L.D. previously worked with the California State Chamber of Commerce and California Taxpayers Association.
In 1980 L.D. married his high school sweetheart, Virginia, in Hannibal, Mo. Since that time, they have resided in Sacramento. Calif. L.D. was an avid tennis player, Elks Club member, president of the University of Missouri Alumni Association-Sacramento chapter, and Cal Chamber member.
L.D. was preceded in death by his mother and father, Faye and Leslie Howe; his sister, Marilyn; his aunt, Ruth Kispert; and his son-in law, Martin Hulse.
He is survived by his loving wife, Virginia. His surviving children include son, Steven Howe; daughter, Marilyn Hillman and partner, Kip Baldwin, and daughter, Carol Hulse, all of the Bay Area. His surviving family also includes stepchildren, Paul Leverington and Rebecca Crocker, both of Springfield, Mo. L.D. also enjoyed and is survived by his grandchildren, Charles Scearce of Rapid City, S.D., Alex Leverington and partner, Kyndra Jones, and Andrew Leverington and partner, Erin, all of Springfield, Mo. He was also blessed with two great-granddaughters, Alivia Scearce, of Rapid City, S.D., and Christina Leverington, Springfield, Mo.
We honor L.D. Howe on a life well lived and well loved.
Graveside services with full military honors by Emmette J Shields American Legion Post No. 55 will be at 2 p.m. Thursday, May 3, 2012, at the Mount Olivet Cemetery in Hannibal, Mo. The Rev. David Scott will officiate.
There will be no visitation, but friends and family are invited to attend graveside services.
The family is being served by the James O’Donnell Funeral Home of Hannibal, Mo.
Online condolences may be made at www.jamesodonnellfuneralhome.com.

Leslie D. Howe - Hannibal.net

Long-time Legislative Advocate for the California Retailers Association Leslie D. Howe passed away on April 24, 2012.
He was born in Brookfield, Mo., on Nov. 12, 1923, to Faye and Leslie Howe.
In 1941, L.D. graduated from Hannibal High School, a champion high jumper, basketball star and pool shark extraordinaire. He was enrolled at the University of Missouri, Columbia, when World War II interrupted his college career. On Dec. 12, 1942, L.D. enlisted in the United States Navy and was stationed at University of California at Berkeley. While in the Navy, L.D. continued to hone his high jumping skills, breaking and setting records. Upon separation from the U.S. Navy in 1946, he served many years as an officer in the Naval Reserves.
L.D. earned a B.S. degree in public administration from the University of Missouri in 1947 and the degree of Master of Science in Government Management from the University of Denver. He subsequently had a Fellowship in Governmental Affairs.
In 1948, while doing post graduate work at the University of Denver, L.D. took first place in the high jump in the Rocky Mountain Association AAU Track and Field meet. This win qualified L.D. to try out for the 1948 Olympics.
L.D. enjoyed a long and successful career as vice president, Governmental Affairs, for the California Retailers Association, eventually assuming the position of president of the Association. L.D. was named among the Top 20 Lobbyists by the California Journal, The Monthly Report on State Government and Politics, September, 1974. In the publication, California’s Tax Machine: A History of Taxing and Spending in the Golden State, written by David R. Doerr, second edition, 2008, Les Howe “…played a key role in promoting the exemption [California inventory property tax exemption].”
L.D. previously worked with the California State Chamber of Commerce and California Taxpayers Association.
In 1980 L.D. married his high school sweetheart, Virginia, in Hannibal, Mo. Since that time, they have resided in Sacramento. Calif. L.D. was an avid tennis player, Elks Club member, president of the University of Missouri Alumni Association-Sacramento chapter, and Cal Chamber member.
L.D. was preceded in death by his mother and father, Faye and Leslie Howe; his sister, Marilyn; his aunt, Ruth Kispert; and his son-in law, Martin Hulse.
He is survived by his loving wife, Virginia. His surviving children include son, Steven Howe; daughter, Marilyn Hillman and partner, Kip Baldwin, and daughter, Carol Hulse, all of the Bay Area. His surviving family also includes stepchildren, Paul Leverington and Rebecca Crocker, both of Springfield, Mo. L.D. also enjoyed and is survived by his grandchildren, Charles Scearce of Rapid City, S.D., Alex Leverington and partner, Kyndra Jones, and Andrew Leverington and partner, Erin, all of Springfield, Mo. He was also blessed with two great-granddaughters, Alivia Scearce, of Rapid City, S.D., and Christina Leverington, Springfield, Mo.
We honor L.D. Howe on a life well lived and well loved.
Graveside services with full military honors by Emmette J Shields American Legion Post No. 55 will be at 2 p.m. Thursday, May 3, 2012, at the Mount Olivet Cemetery in Hannibal, Mo. The Rev. David Scott will officiate.
There will be no visitation, but friends and family are invited to attend graveside services.
The family is being served by the James O’Donnell Funeral Home of Hannibal, Mo.
Online condolences may be made at www.jamesodonnellfuneralhome.com.

Leslie D. Howe - Hannibal.net

Long-time Legislative Advocate for the California Retailers Association Leslie D. Howe passed away on April 24, 2012.
He was born in Brookfield, Mo., on Nov. 12, 1923, to Faye and Leslie Howe.
In 1941, L.D. graduated from Hannibal High School, a champion high jumper, basketball star and pool shark extraordinaire. He was enrolled at the University of Missouri, Columbia, when World War II interrupted his college career. On Dec. 12, 1942, L.D. enlisted in the United States Navy and was stationed at University of California at Berkeley. While in the Navy, L.D. continued to hone his high jumping skills, breaking and setting records. Upon separation from the U.S. Navy in 1946, he served many years as an officer in the Naval Reserves.
L.D. earned a B.S. degree in public administration from the University of Missouri in 1947 and the degree of Master of Science in Government Management from the University of Denver. He subsequently had a Fellowship in Governmental Affairs.
In 1948, while doing post graduate work at the University of Denver, L.D. took first place in the high jump in the Rocky Mountain Association AAU Track and Field meet. This win qualified L.D. to try out for the 1948 Olympics.
L.D. enjoyed a long and successful career as vice president, Governmental Affairs, for the California Retailers Association, eventually assuming the position of president of the Association. L.D. was named among the Top 20 Lobbyists by the California Journal, The Monthly Report on State Government and Politics, September, 1974. In the publication, California’s Tax Machine: A History of Taxing and Spending in the Golden State, written by David R. Doerr, second edition, 2008, Les Howe “…played a key role in promoting the exemption [California inventory property tax exemption].”
L.D. previously worked with the California State Chamber of Commerce and California Taxpayers Association.
In 1980 L.D. married his high school sweetheart, Virginia, in Hannibal, Mo. Since that time, they have resided in Sacramento. Calif. L.D. was an avid tennis player, Elks Club member, president of the University of Missouri Alumni Association-Sacramento chapter, and Cal Chamber member.
L.D. was preceded in death by his mother and father, Faye and Leslie Howe; his sister, Marilyn; his aunt, Ruth Kispert; and his son-in law, Martin Hulse.
He is survived by his loving wife, Virginia. His surviving children include son, Steven Howe; daughter, Marilyn Hillman and partner, Kip Baldwin, and daughter, Carol Hulse, all of the Bay Area. His surviving family also includes stepchildren, Paul Leverington and Rebecca Crocker, both of Springfield, Mo. L.D. also enjoyed and is survived by his grandchildren, Charles Scearce of Rapid City, S.D., Alex Leverington and partner, Kyndra Jones, and Andrew Leverington and partner, Erin, all of Springfield, Mo. He was also blessed with two great-granddaughters, Alivia Scearce, of Rapid City, S.D., and Christina Leverington, Springfield, Mo.
We honor L.D. Howe on a life well lived and well loved.
Graveside services with full military honors by Emmette J Shields American Legion Post No. 55 will be at 2 p.m. Thursday, May 3, 2012, at the Mount Olivet Cemetery in Hannibal, Mo. The Rev. David Scott will officiate.
There will be no visitation, but friends and family are invited to attend graveside services.
The family is being served by the James O’Donnell Funeral Home of Hannibal, Mo.
Online condolences may be made at www.jamesodonnellfuneralhome.com.

Hellinghausen and Villamaria sign soccer scholarships - Belton Journal

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Hellinghausen and Villamaria sign soccer scholarships - Belton Journal

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JOHN 'JACK' CONRAD - Hornell Evening Tribune

John “Jack” Conrad, 75, passed away Thursday afternoon (April 26), 2012 at his home on Pfaff Hollow Road.

  Jack was born Nov. 1, 1936, in Wayland, the son of Anthony Sr. and Mary (Kuhn) Conrad. He grew up in the Wayland/Perkinsville area and has remained a life resident of these areas. He served his country in the United States Marine Corps during the Korean Conflict Era and was honorably discharged. Jack and Jeanette “Jan” Hunt were married July 23, 1966 and together have celebrated over 45 years of marriage. Jack was employed by the Getinge USA, Inc. (formerly Sybron-Castle) working in the maintenance department. He retired in the mid 1990s and has enjoyed his retirement spending time with his wife, children and grandchildren.

Jack was a past president and life member of the Perkinsville Fire Department and a communicant of Sacred Heart Church. Throughout the years he has enjoyed camping in many local areas along with Canada and Alaska. Fishing and hunting are favorite pastimes especially the moose and elk hunting trips he has taken with his family.

  Jack was predeceased by his parents Anthony Sr. and Mary Conrad; and a sister, Alice Merkle. He is survived by his wife, Jeanette “Jan” Conrad of Perkinsville; his children, Ronald (Barbara) Conrad of Wayland, Randy (Sheila) Conrad of Dansville, and Elizabeth “Beth” (Mike) Caito of Dansville; his grandchildren, Jennifer (Joshua) Sordahl, Amy, Amanda, Kiersten and Hayley Paige Conrad and Brendan and Marina Caito; five great-grandchildren; siblings, Helen Milton of Perkinsville, Anthony (Janice) Conrad, Jr. of Alaska, Dorothea (Daniel) Sick of Wayland, Anita Pragle of Wayland, Jeannette (Gerald) Mckee of Dansville, Rose Maher of Glenmont, Ann Wheaton of Avoca, James (Elizabeth) Conrad of Perkinsville, David (Betty) Conrad, of Bath, and Mary (Jim) Williams of Perkinsville; brothers and sisters-in-law, Wayne (Pat) Hunt of Atlanta, Bonnie (Bob) Hughes of Perkinsville, Ann (Bob) Oxx of Wayland, Kathy (Ted) Sears of North Rose, Onlee (Don) Zeh of Cohocton, Les (Jean) Hunt of Wayland, and Bob (Sue) Hunt of Cohocton; along with many many nieces and nephews.

Jack’s family and friends may call today from 1-4 p.m. at the St. George-Stanton Funeral Home, 109 W. Naples St., Wayland. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated Monday at 11 a.m. at Sacred Heart Church in Perkinsville. Military honors will take place at the church. Internment will be at the convenience of Jack’s family. Memorial contributions in John “Jack” Conrad’s memory may be made to the Vincent House, 310 Second Ave., Wayland, NY 14572.

JOHN 'JACK' CONRAD - Hornell Evening Tribune

John “Jack” Conrad, 75, passed away Thursday afternoon (April 26), 2012 at his home on Pfaff Hollow Road.

  Jack was born Nov. 1, 1936, in Wayland, the son of Anthony Sr. and Mary (Kuhn) Conrad. He grew up in the Wayland/Perkinsville area and has remained a life resident of these areas. He served his country in the United States Marine Corps during the Korean Conflict Era and was honorably discharged. Jack and Jeanette “Jan” Hunt were married July 23, 1966 and together have celebrated over 45 years of marriage. Jack was employed by the Getinge USA, Inc. (formerly Sybron-Castle) working in the maintenance department. He retired in the mid 1990s and has enjoyed his retirement spending time with his wife, children and grandchildren.

Jack was a past president and life member of the Perkinsville Fire Department and a communicant of Sacred Heart Church. Throughout the years he has enjoyed camping in many local areas along with Canada and Alaska. Fishing and hunting are favorite pastimes especially the moose and elk hunting trips he has taken with his family.

  Jack was predeceased by his parents Anthony Sr. and Mary Conrad; and a sister, Alice Merkle. He is survived by his wife, Jeanette “Jan” Conrad of Perkinsville; his children, Ronald (Barbara) Conrad of Wayland, Randy (Sheila) Conrad of Dansville, and Elizabeth “Beth” (Mike) Caito of Dansville; his grandchildren, Jennifer (Joshua) Sordahl, Amy, Amanda, Kiersten and Hayley Paige Conrad and Brendan and Marina Caito; five great-grandchildren; siblings, Helen Milton of Perkinsville, Anthony (Janice) Conrad, Jr. of Alaska, Dorothea (Daniel) Sick of Wayland, Anita Pragle of Wayland, Jeannette (Gerald) Mckee of Dansville, Rose Maher of Glenmont, Ann Wheaton of Avoca, James (Elizabeth) Conrad of Perkinsville, David (Betty) Conrad, of Bath, and Mary (Jim) Williams of Perkinsville; brothers and sisters-in-law, Wayne (Pat) Hunt of Atlanta, Bonnie (Bob) Hughes of Perkinsville, Ann (Bob) Oxx of Wayland, Kathy (Ted) Sears of North Rose, Onlee (Don) Zeh of Cohocton, Les (Jean) Hunt of Wayland, and Bob (Sue) Hunt of Cohocton; along with many many nieces and nephews.

Jack’s family and friends may call today from 1-4 p.m. at the St. George-Stanton Funeral Home, 109 W. Naples St., Wayland. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated Monday at 11 a.m. at Sacred Heart Church in Perkinsville. Military honors will take place at the church. Internment will be at the convenience of Jack’s family. Memorial contributions in John “Jack” Conrad’s memory may be made to the Vincent House, 310 Second Ave., Wayland, NY 14572.

What's best for Shaw Air Force Base? - Sumter Item

Those that follow military issues may have read where Congress and even the United States Air Force have suggested the need for at least one more BRAC (Base Realignment and Closure), maybe even two, in the next several years. Some leaders in the Air Force have even suggested that they have as much as a 25 percent surplus in capacity as well.

Our own Shaw Air Force Base has been through BRACs in 1991, 1993, 1995 and the most recent one in 2005. We have been very fortunate to have not only avoided the closing of our base but fortunate enough to have gained a mission with the addition of the Third Army Headquarters. Most of our successes can be based on just two criteria: excellent facilities and a strong mission.

We have been the home to the largest F-16 fighter contingent in the United States and the only Air Force base on the East Coast with dual runways. In the past, we have bragged that we are the home of the 9th Air Force and AFCENT (Air Force Central Command). Now, after the 2005 BRAC, we can boast that we are also the home of the Third Army and ARCENT (Army Central Command).

The Third Army and ARCENT came to Shaw as a result of the 2005 BRAC with the intent to co-locate two of the Air Force's and Army's most historic units at one place for training, education, familiarization, cooperation and collaboration. These units have fought beside one another since the Normandy invasion with current responsibilities that include CENTCOM (Central Command) and the Middle East.

In September 2009 Gen. Norton Schwartz (19th chief of staff of the Air Force) decided to move the AFCENT commander, a three- star general, "forward" to the war zone where that commander would reside. Leaders in the Sumter community immediately contacted congressmen and senators to voice our concerns with this move. It was during a hearing of the Senate Armed Services Committee that Schwartz assured Sen. Lindsey Graham that he would return the "three-star flag" back to Shaw at the end of the war. At the time of the announcement, the date was to be 2014.

We have often expressed concern that this move was a violation of the intent of BRAC which was to locate AFCENT and ARCENT at the same military installation. After all, the commander of the Third Army resides right here in Sumter with this family.

In the early fall of 2012, the president of the United States will appoint a new chief of staff of the Air Force. Some of us in our community have expressed our continued concern to Graham, and he continues to ensure us it's on his "agenda and radar."

We feel it is time for the S.C. Congressional Delegation to demand and receive a firm public commitment, with a date, by the leadership of the Air Force to rejoin 9th Air Force and AFCENT command structures and to relocate the units back at Shaw. With the uncertainly in the current Department of Defense budgets, it only makes sense that with the facilities already existing here at Shaw (a $20 million expansion is currently under way on the AFCENT building) that the units be relocated back here. The expense of trying to duplicate an operation center in a foreign country is not necessary anymore. Additionally, these military folks and their families are living in high risk zones.

We are hoping Graham, Sen. Jim DeMint and Rep. Mick Mulvaney will step up and get us a firm date when the AFCENT flag will return home to Shaw. It's time to bring the AFCENT command, the flag and, most importantly, the families back to Sumter and Shaw.

Jack Osteen is publisher of The Item newspaper. He also serves as vice chair of the Sumter Military Affairs Committee.

What's best for Shaw Air Force Base? - Sumter Item

Those that follow military issues may have read where Congress and even the United States Air Force have suggested the need for at least one more BRAC (Base Realignment and Closure), maybe even two, in the next several years. Some leaders in the Air Force have even suggested that they have as much as a 25 percent surplus in capacity as well.

Our own Shaw Air Force Base has been through BRACs in 1991, 1993, 1995 and the most recent one in 2005. We have been very fortunate to have not only avoided the closing of our base but fortunate enough to have gained a mission with the addition of the Third Army Headquarters. Most of our successes can be based on just two criteria: excellent facilities and a strong mission.

We have been the home to the largest F-16 fighter contingent in the United States and the only Air Force base on the East Coast with dual runways. In the past, we have bragged that we are the home of the 9th Air Force and AFCENT (Air Force Central Command). Now, after the 2005 BRAC, we can boast that we are also the home of the Third Army and ARCENT (Army Central Command).

The Third Army and ARCENT came to Shaw as a result of the 2005 BRAC with the intent to co-locate two of the Air Force's and Army's most historic units at one place for training, education, familiarization, cooperation and collaboration. These units have fought beside one another since the Normandy invasion with current responsibilities that include CENTCOM (Central Command) and the Middle East.

In September 2009 Gen. Norton Schwartz (19th chief of staff of the Air Force) decided to move the AFCENT commander, a three- star general, "forward" to the war zone where that commander would reside. Leaders in the Sumter community immediately contacted congressmen and senators to voice our concerns with this move. It was during a hearing of the Senate Armed Services Committee that Schwartz assured Sen. Lindsey Graham that he would return the "three-star flag" back to Shaw at the end of the war. At the time of the announcement, the date was to be 2014.

We have often expressed concern that this move was a violation of the intent of BRAC which was to locate AFCENT and ARCENT at the same military installation. After all, the commander of the Third Army resides right here in Sumter with this family.

In the early fall of 2012, the president of the United States will appoint a new chief of staff of the Air Force. Some of us in our community have expressed our continued concern to Graham, and he continues to ensure us it's on his "agenda and radar."

We feel it is time for the S.C. Congressional Delegation to demand and receive a firm public commitment, with a date, by the leadership of the Air Force to rejoin 9th Air Force and AFCENT command structures and to relocate the units back at Shaw. With the uncertainly in the current Department of Defense budgets, it only makes sense that with the facilities already existing here at Shaw (a $20 million expansion is currently under way on the AFCENT building) that the units be relocated back here. The expense of trying to duplicate an operation center in a foreign country is not necessary anymore. Additionally, these military folks and their families are living in high risk zones.

We are hoping Graham, Sen. Jim DeMint and Rep. Mick Mulvaney will step up and get us a firm date when the AFCENT flag will return home to Shaw. It's time to bring the AFCENT command, the flag and, most importantly, the families back to Sumter and Shaw.

Jack Osteen is publisher of The Item newspaper. He also serves as vice chair of the Sumter Military Affairs Committee.

Harry F. Miller, 75 - Muncie Star Press

MUNCIE - Harry F. Miller, 75, passed away Saturday, April 28, 2012 at his residence.

He was born in Muncie on May 22, 1936 the son of Chester Earl and Frances Ellen Miller and served his country in The United States Army.

Harry retired from Duffy Tool and Stamping after twenty-eight years of service.

He is survived by his wife, Sharon Miller of Muncie; his children, Jennifer R. Miller of Ohio, Troy Miller of Muncie, Renee Waechter-Kear of Muncie and Diane Waechter-Inman (husband, Brian) of Sulpher Springs; a brother, Pastor Jerry Miller (wife, Bernice) of Muncie; a sister, Sarah Miller-Lawson (husband, Roger) of Muncie; also surviving are his grandchildren, Tara Miller of Muncie, Zoee Kear and Zane Kear of Muncie, and Caleb Inman of Sulpher Springs.

He was preceded in death by his parents; a brother, Robert Otis Miller; and a sister, Flora Mae Miller-Eartle.

Services will be 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 1, 2012 at The Meeks Mortuary and Crematory with Pastor Mark Ellcessor officiating. Cremation will follow.

Family and friends may call from 3:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday at The Meeks Mortuary and Crematory, Washington Street Chapel.

In lieu of flowers contributions may be directed to I.U. Health Ball Memorial Hospice or I.U. Health Ball Memorial Cancer Center, 2401 West University Avenue, Muncie, Indiana 47303.

Online condolences may be sent to the family at http://www.meeksmortuary.com.

Harry F. Miller, 75 - Muncie Star Press

MUNCIE - Harry F. Miller, 75, passed away Saturday, April 28, 2012 at his residence.

He was born in Muncie on May 22, 1936 the son of Chester Earl and Frances Ellen Miller and served his country in The United States Army.

Harry retired from Duffy Tool and Stamping after twenty-eight years of service.

He is survived by his wife, Sharon Miller of Muncie; his children, Jennifer R. Miller of Ohio, Troy Miller of Muncie, Renee Waechter-Kear of Muncie and Diane Waechter-Inman (husband, Brian) of Sulpher Springs; a brother, Pastor Jerry Miller (wife, Bernice) of Muncie; a sister, Sarah Miller-Lawson (husband, Roger) of Muncie; also surviving are his grandchildren, Tara Miller of Muncie, Zoee Kear and Zane Kear of Muncie, and Caleb Inman of Sulpher Springs.

He was preceded in death by his parents; a brother, Robert Otis Miller; and a sister, Flora Mae Miller-Eartle.

Services will be 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 1, 2012 at The Meeks Mortuary and Crematory with Pastor Mark Ellcessor officiating. Cremation will follow.

Family and friends may call from 3:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday at The Meeks Mortuary and Crematory, Washington Street Chapel.

In lieu of flowers contributions may be directed to I.U. Health Ball Memorial Hospice or I.U. Health Ball Memorial Cancer Center, 2401 West University Avenue, Muncie, Indiana 47303.

Online condolences may be sent to the family at http://www.meeksmortuary.com.

Saturday, April 28, 2012

Rick Montgomery Brogdon, 57 - Kitsap Sun

Photo with no caption

Rick Montgomery Brogdon

of Bremerton

March 13, 1955

to April 23, 2012

Veteran

Rick Montgomery Brogdon passed away on April 23, 2012 in Bremerton, Washington at the age of 57.

Rick was born on March 13, 1955 in Muskogee, Oklahoma to Leonard C. and Wanda L. (Spears) Brogdon. He graduated from Shawnee Mission North High School in Kansas City, Missouri and in 1974 he enlisted in the United States Navy. It was there that he became a Russian and Hebrew linguist. He was stationed all over the world including Spain, Greece, Turkey, California and South Carolina.

On April 21, 1977 he married Catherine M. (Patacki) Brogdon in Gibraltar, UK. He left the Navy in 1986 and went on to attend the University of Nebraska where he received his Doctor of Pharmacy degree. In 1992 Rick went back into the Navy as an Officer and served as a Pharmacist.

He retired in 2001 from service and went on to become a retail Pharmacist in the Bremerton area.

Rick had many personal interests including snowboarding, kiteboarding, hiking, biking and generally anything that had to do with being outdoors.

Rick is preceded in death by his parents.

Treasuring his memory are his wife, Catherine; sons, Aaron C. Brogdon and Keenan G. Brogdon both of Bremerton; sisters, Crystal Matz of Omaha, Nebraska, Linda O'Connor of New York and Stacy Rabon of Georgetown, South Carolina.

Viewing will take place Tuesday, May 1 from 12:00-3:00pm and Wednesday, May 2, 2012 from 11:00-2:00pm at Lewis Funeral Chapel. A service will follow the viewing at 3:00pm on May 2, 2012.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Crisis Clinic of the Peninsulas, a local suicide prevention organization. Please mail donations to Kitsap Mental Health Services Attn: Development & Community Relations at 5455 Almira Dr. NE, Bremerton, WA 98311. Please visit the online memorial at www.lewischapel.com.